National Writing Project

Digital Storytelling: Using Technology in the Classroom that is Context-embedded, Inquiry-driven, and Socially Negotiated

Summary: Fred Mindlin, a teacher-consultant with the Central California Writing Project, writes that Digital Story Telling can build students' self-esteem and ownership of their work and advance their problem solving skills. The work of Peter Kittle of the Northern California Writing Project is described in the article.

 

Excerpt from Article

What excites me about the form is its use as a tool for writing instruction. It resonated with my approach as a "writer's workshop" elementary school teacher, where reading one's work aloud to a circle of peers was an essential part of the process of writing. Negotiating the content of digital story scripts in a group situation gives authenticity to the editing process. Most importantly, reading a script aloud gives weight and meaning to the word "voice" that no amount of instruction about "finding one's voice as a writer" ever can. When students begin to feel the power they have, using their writing to give literal voice to their unique points of view, and then get credit as the writer/director/producer/editor of a short film, it's not just an "elevation" of self-esteem but a real transformation, from a fixed mindset—I can't write—to a growth mindset—I made a movie!

Copyright © 2009 California Educational Technology Professionals Association. Reprinted with permission.
Mindlin, Fred. 2009. "Digital Storytelling: Using Technology in the Classroom that is Context-embedded, Inquiry-driven, and Socially Negotiated." CEPTA DataBus 49 (2): 12-14.

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