National Writing Project

Opening the Door to Discourse: Cooperation, Authority, and the Inner-City High School Writing Center

Date: June 10, 2011

Summary: Alaina Feltenberger discusses making high school writing centers a reality within inner-city high schools.

 

Excerpt from Article

Once established, a secondary-level writing center would require very little maintenance to ensure its sustainability if the workload were distributed evenly throughout the entire faculty. If the writing center coordinator taught fewer classes than other staff, and if other staff members rotated time supervising the space, a writing center could become a reality in even the most frugal of schools. The only requirement would be a shared enthusiasm for the writing center's potential, for as Jake Gaskins put it, "successful tutorials depend, not only on the skill and training of the tutor, not only on the attitude and engagement of the student, but also on the collaboration of faculty who share our goals."

Copyright © 2008 PRAXIS: A Writing Center Journal. Reprinted with permission.
Feltenberger, Alaina. 2008. "Opening the Door to Discourse: Cooperation, Authority, and the Inner-City High School Writing Center" PRAXIS: A Writing Center Journal (Spring 2008, Vol. 5, Issue 2)

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